A Twist on the Feathered Chevron Blanket


Today, after my first official pattern has been on the market for one whole month, I am here to give you some different yarns you can use to make the Feathered Chevron Blanket. The pattern calls for a worsted weight yarn, but I have had a fun time playing around with different yarn weights this month and I am here to give you the scoop as to what I have learned working with these different yarns.

Before we begin, you will need the pattern. You can find the pattern itself here, on the blog, or you can purchase the pattern on Etsy or Ravelry where you will receive a photo tutorial and a link to a video that will walk you through the project.

Worsted Weight:

First off, let's look at the original Feathered Chevron Blanket which is worked in a worsted weight yarn. My favorite aspect of this one is how affordable it is. Any good acrylic worsted weight yarn will do and only four skeins are needed which means that you can spend as little as $13 on a beautiful baby blanket. I used the Big Twist Value Yarn from Joann fabrics, 2 skeins of each color which comes out to approximately 540 yards for the main color and 460 yards of the contrasting color. If using a J hook, which gives a good drape, you will want to have a starting chain 114 and work 65 rows. This will give you a 30” by 32” baby blanket. For a finished look, I added tassels on the peak of each chevron using the contrasting color.

DK Weight:

I knew I wanted to make another Feathered Chevron Blanket for my sister-in-law who is expecting a baby this October, but the only variegated yarn that matched her color scheme was in a DK weight so I decided to take on a challenge. I am so glad I did because it turned out simply beautiful! For this blanket I used Hobby Lobby’s Baby Bee Sweet Delights yarn in Tricycle Time and Cloudy. Because of the smaller weight, I used a little more yardage but that makes sense, right? Cloudy was my main color and it took a little over 2 skeins (775 yards). Tricycle Time was the contrasting color and used one and a half skeins which adds up to be about 500 yards. The price of DK yarn is usually more expensive than a worsted but it is so worth it because this blanket had the most perfect drape. I think I ended up spending about $26.45 on the yarn but the DK weight is just perfect for baby blankets. I will definitely be using it again.

I wanted to make this blanket a little bit bigger for my sister-in-law so I knew I had to add stitches to my beginning chain. The smaller weight also played into that so the beginning chain grew to be 146 stitches. The row count also grew to 81 but it made a blanket that was 36” by 36” - perfect size for a swaddle! Because it was quite a bit bigger, I decided to keep the edging simple. I still did the single crochet around the edge but I didn’t put tassels or fringe on the peaked edges. You very well could, just not the look I was going for. I can’t forget to let you know that an I hook is what you’ll need to work this blanket up. I know it sounds kind of big for a DK weight but like I said earlier, it gave it the perfect drape.

Super Bulky:

Does anyone else have those random skeins of bulky yarn in your closet? You know the ones you bought for a dollar at the end of last year’s winter season but still haven’t found anything to use them with. Well, my closet had plenty, plenty for another Feathered Chevron blanket and that is where the idea for the third Feathered Chevron came from. This blanket is another large one, same size as the DK weight, 36” by 36”. The hardest part about working with a super bulky weight yarn was getting a good drape. It’s hard to do! Super bulky yarn was not made to drape but by using a 12.0 mm hook, the drape turned out perfect. To get the perfect size, I lowered the number of stitches for the beginning chain down to 66 and it only took 37 rows to get it square. I think it has been my most popular blanket so far amongst my Instagram followers.